»Me, myself and BI«

Bissantz ponders


Friday, May 1st, 2009

The ‘moving’ means to an end

Hans Rosling wanted to show the best statistics ever seen at a TED conference. In my opinion, it was only one of the best presentations of statistics. Here are the pros and cons for using animation in data analysis.

Friday, April 17th, 2009

Vis‑à-vis is not yet visualization

Analyzing means comparing. That is the central rule here. Placing objects next to each other, however, rarely suffices as a comparison. In order to see what there is to see, you usually you have to do some subtracting first.

Friday, April 3rd, 2009

Bean counter … and proud of it

Controllers are bean counters – and that is a good thing! After all, good entrepreneurs are as well. And too many captains on one ship spoil the course.

Friday, March 20th, 2009

Gold mine or mine disaster?

The expectations for data mining were very high. Its new methods were supposed to automatically uncover the buried information treasures in databases. Now, the German magazine ‘Wirtschaftsinformatik’ has reprinted an article on this subject in its 50th anniversary commemorative issue. What better reason to look back at 16 years of data mining!

Friday, March 6th, 2009

Your circles disturb me

Since the death of Archimedes, everyone knows that drawing circles brings nothing but trouble. JP Morgan shows us why … as if it didn’t have enough problems already.

Friday, February 20th, 2009

May you chop axes? No…you must!

Today we’ll discuss another important rule in designing graphics. You CAN chop line charts because they should visualize the largest possible differences.

Friday, February 6th, 2009

German Newspaper FAZ uses sparklines (well, almost…)

This blog makes regular pleas for maximum information density. And newspapers offer many great examples. Now, FAZ is further improving its density – to cut costs – and is starting to use graphical tables. Which offers more analytical insight on stock quotes to us readers.

Friday, January 23rd, 2009

Presenting data correctly: perceptive priority

What “perceptive priority” is, which design rules we can learn from it, and how it can protect us from botching our next presentation of numbers.

Friday, January 9th, 2009

More pie, anyone?

This blog is for the pie haters out there. If you have a sensitive stomach, please read with caution! Nothing but pies and one is worse than the next. This time, with examples from FTD, Handelsblatt, WamS and SZ…

Friday, December 26th, 2008

Pies are for eating – not measuring!

After plenty of goose, duck and gingerbread, here’s something else to chew on. The pies have got to go! Warning: This blog is nothing for those with weak stomachs.

Essays

Death to business charts!
Why business charts must die

Graphic tables
Lay back and control

Industrial reporting
Production-like efficiency for management reporting

Can we drive companies
like we do cars?

Against dashboards, speedometers and traffic lights in Controlling

Business Intelligence 2.0
modest, serious, sincere

Rediscovering slowness
Sparklines make us John Franklins in management information.

Good reporting is boring
Looking for excitement?
Try a night on the town instead.

Are sports fans smarter
than managers?

Management reports need to become more dense and dashboards more rare

The myth of data mining
Why men don't buy beer and diapers at the same time.

Numerical blindness?
I wouldn't see a doctor, if I were you.