»Me, myself and BI«

Bissantz ponders


Friday, October 29th, 2010

Do seven words say more than a chart?

Some charts need more than 1,000 words. Yet, sometimes, seven words can be more effective than a chart. Today, we will put an end to the myth that all charts are pictures – and chatterboxes as well.

Friday, April 17th, 2009

Vis‑à-vis is not yet visualization

Analyzing means comparing. That is the central rule here. Placing objects next to each other, however, rarely suffices as a comparison. In order to see what there is to see, you usually you have to do some subtracting first.

Friday, February 6th, 2009

German Newspaper FAZ uses sparklines (well, almost…)

This blog makes regular pleas for maximum information density. And newspapers offer many great examples. Now, FAZ is further improving its density – to cut costs – and is starting to use graphical tables. Which offers more analytical insight on stock quotes to us readers.

Friday, January 23rd, 2009

Presenting data correctly: perceptive priority

What “perceptive priority” is, which design rules we can learn from it, and how it can protect us from botching our next presentation of numbers.

Friday, January 9th, 2009

More pie, anyone?

This blog is for the pie haters out there. If you have a sensitive stomach, please read with caution! Nothing but pies and one is worse than the next. This time, with examples from FTD, Handelsblatt, WamS and SZ…

Friday, November 14th, 2008

Numbers people vs. graphics people

Some people think that numbers people read data differently than graphics people. Is that true? Does this sub-division of the homo numericus really exist? And if so, do we need to present information to them in different ways?

Friday, June 27th, 2008

The seventh dan: Put it in writing

If you are comfortable enough with presenting data in tables and charts, the next challenge is putting that information into words. The way that Peter Singer backs his positions is an excellent example.

Friday, January 18th, 2008

Death to business charts!

Dense, straightforward charts are rare. As a student, I was amazed how the graphic designers at management consultancies worked with such meticulous detail. Years later, I am convinced that we simply have to bid standard business charts farewell. They will die out slowly but surely…or to word that a bit more positively, they will be replaced by efficient graphical tables. All we need to do is follow twelve simple steps…

Friday, November 23rd, 2007

Can we steer cars like businesses?

We have already discussed the fact that no one in their right mind should steer a company (or a bank in particular!) like an automobile. But what about the other way around? Porsche’s Sport Chrono package has similarities with management reports. That, indeed, could be useful.

Friday, September 7th, 2007

Sure-fire ways to spoil data, Part I

If you want to make the consumers of charts truly unhappy, just follow these simple rules from the statistician Howard Wainer.

Essays

Death to business charts!
Why business charts must die

Graphic tables
Lay back and control

Industrial reporting
Production-like efficiency for management reporting

Can we drive companies
like we do cars?

Against dashboards, speedometers and traffic lights in Controlling

Business Intelligence 2.0
modest, serious, sincere

Rediscovering slowness
Sparklines make us John Franklins in management information.

Good reporting is boring
Looking for excitement?
Try a night on the town instead.

Are sports fans smarter
than managers?

Management reports need to become more dense and dashboards more rare

The myth of data mining
Why men don't buy beer and diapers at the same time.

Numerical blindness?
I wouldn't see a doctor, if I were you.