»Me, myself and BI«

Bissantz ponders


Friday, May 29th, 2009

Palace evolution

Controlling guerillas aren’t being turned away at palace gates anymore. Discover why that is as well as other lessons learned at our Executive Forum last Monday in Berlin.

Friday, April 17th, 2009

Vis‑à-vis is not yet visualization

Analyzing means comparing. That is the central rule here. Placing objects next to each other, however, rarely suffices as a comparison. In order to see what there is to see, you usually you have to do some subtracting first.

Friday, April 3rd, 2009

Bean counter … and proud of it

Controllers are bean counters – and that is a good thing! After all, good entrepreneurs are as well. And too many captains on one ship spoil the course.

Friday, October 3rd, 2008

Do managers have to ride rabid tigers? Part II

In Part I, we reviewed Bella’s law of proportionality, measured it with the lie factor, and tried to save the world through standardization. Today, we will tame the tiger for good.

Friday, June 13th, 2008

Numbers are good. (But sometimes none are better.)

Numbers are an aspect of reports. If you don’t understand the background, however, they fall short of their purpose. For Audi and Peugeot, it’s the same story tomorrow in Le Mans.

Friday, April 25th, 2008

BI, Robot

Automation is the key to efficient reporting. Forget control robots or Artificial Intelligence – all you need is common sense and just a bit of programming.

Friday, May 4th, 2007

Smoke signals aren’t enough – using the gross margin flow analysis, Part I

Gross margin flow analysis breaks down a margin variance by its components to deliver important clues about the underlying causes. This way you determine if a price increase really leads to higher sales discounts.

Friday, April 6th, 2007

Interview with Professor Dr. Rolf Hichert

A vehement advocate for good information visualization, Professor Dr. Rolf Hichert has successfully spent the past few years preaching his doctrine at controller conventions and seminars throughout Germany, Austria and Switzerland. In this German interview he explains that bad report design plagues companies of all sizes and industries. In addition to pointing out the cardinal faux pas of reporting, Hichert takes a critical look at consultancies and other influential industries.

Friday, January 12th, 2007

When purchasing gets cloudy…

Purchasing is the ugly stepchild and sleeping beauty rolled into one. If you can wake it from its spell, you will reap in treasures of information. What are we purchasing? How can we save? How much? EDS, the largest outsourcer in the world, is a specialist in the field of purchasing control. Learn in this interview with Dr. Jörg Dittrich how this came about and why DeltaMaster plays a major role in the implementation. (German only)

Tuesday, November 14th, 2006

“Half of all companies don’t calculate their numbers correctly!“

The world’s first seminar on gross margin flow analysis was held on October 17, 2006 in Nuremberg, Germany. Managers from Audi, Nordsee, Sanitop and wolfcraft shared their experiences with this innovative method of deviation analysis. The father of gross margin flow, Professor Dr. Jörg Link, held the key note speech. Some more in-depth insight into his theory and its practical reference are available in my interview with him.

Essays

Death to business charts!
Why business charts must die

Graphic tables
Lay back and control

Industrial reporting
Production-like efficiency for management reporting

Can we drive companies
like we do cars?

Against dashboards, speedometers and traffic lights in Controlling

Business Intelligence 2.0
modest, serious, sincere

Rediscovering slowness
Sparklines make us John Franklins in management information.

Good reporting is boring
Looking for excitement?
Try a night on the town instead.

Are sports fans smarter
than managers?

Management reports need to become more dense and dashboards more rare

The myth of data mining
Why men don't buy beer and diapers at the same time.

Numerical blindness?
I wouldn't see a doctor, if I were you.