»Me, myself and BI«

Bissantz ponders


Friday, March 6th, 2009

Your circles disturb me

Since the death of Archimedes, everyone knows that drawing circles brings nothing but trouble. JP Morgan shows us why … as if it didn’t have enough problems already.

Friday, October 26th, 2007

Beautiful evidence for debating executive salaries

Management salaries are a hot topic nowadays. The usual “evidence”, however, is either manipulated in one direction or the other. Good information design can help make the discussion more objective. The New York Times shows how.

Friday, September 21st, 2007

Can we steer banks like cars?

Sachsen LB could have at least tried to. Their board of directors trusted a few traffic lights. They were usually green, but now all German taxpayers see is red.

Friday, July 13th, 2007

Galileo, the world’s first information designer (Art and data analysis, Part II)

In the days of modern, high-resolution photography, it’s sometimes hard to believe that Galileo’s tools were limited to pen and paper. His observations of the moon are sketched with the precision of a scientist and the artistic prowess of a Michelangelo. His drawings are the data material for his analysis. It’s the artistic prowess of the reproduction – and not the mere ornamentation – that distinguishes first-class information graphics.

Friday, March 30th, 2007

The eight commandments of good visualization

Thou shall honor these eight simple visualization principles of Edward Tufte – or have a darn good reason not to! They apply for the first map carved in stone over 6000 years ago just as they do for contemporary Web sites. Sometimes the best thing that information design can do is simply not to destroy good content.

Friday, March 23rd, 2007

Ivy League Rock and Roll – A day with Edward Tufte

Edward Tufte, the world’s most renowned visualization expert, holds legendary information design seminars up to 40 times a year. What an experience!

Monday, November 6th, 2006

Good reporting is boring

“Good management is boring” says Peter Drucker and “If you want excitement, don’t go to a good management information system.” We should reflect on this statement if we do not want to amuse but to inform executives.

Monday, November 6th, 2006

Rediscovering slowness in today’s fast-paced information society

From Sten Nadolny’s famous book we can learn that speed does not lead to the goal if it comes along with superficialness – and that slowness is the basic principle of close attention and thoroughness. Graphics in the size of a word establish this thoroughness. They are the milestone that is going to change the way we deal with numbers and data.

Tuesday, October 3rd, 2006

Business Intelligence 2.0

Is Business Intelligence itself only a hype without any proven benefit for companies? How can it be that successful companies existed before BI? These and other questions are discussed in an Interview with Dr. Nicolas Bissantz. In it, he sketches a modest and honest industry of BI software providers for the future.

Tuesday, June 21st, 2005

Dashboard or Trashboard?

Adored by the software industry and hated by visualization experts – those colorful little controlling speedometers that are supposed to, at a glance, tell executives whether the company is headed for a brick wall or staying on course. Is the dashboard metaphor really a suitable approach for visualizing key business figures?

Essays

Death to business charts!
Why business charts must die

Graphic tables
Lay back and control

Industrial reporting
Production-like efficiency for management reporting

Can we drive companies
like we do cars?

Against dashboards, speedometers and traffic lights in Controlling

Business Intelligence 2.0
modest, serious, sincere

Rediscovering slowness
Sparklines make us John Franklins in management information.

Good reporting is boring
Looking for excitement?
Try a night on the town instead.

Are sports fans smarter
than managers?

Management reports need to become more dense and dashboards more rare

The myth of data mining
Why men don't buy beer and diapers at the same time.

Numerical blindness?
I wouldn't see a doctor, if I were you.